The Challenge of viewing planetary nebula GJJC1

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rcj
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The Challenge of viewing planetary nebula GJJC1

Post by rcj »

Now, this is not your typical everyday DSO object, that you can showcase to other observers, but it would be really cool to try to even see and resolve it - it is a planetary nebulae located within the M22 globular cluster in Sagittarius. There has been amateur reports showing that it has been seen using a variety of instruments ranging from 10" to 30", and with the help of OIII and UHC filters. It resides in one of the dense star fields near the core of M22 (about 1 arc minute away) and about 3 arc-seconds across. It is very near to an reddish and blue star "pair" but it is believed that the central star of the nebulae belongs to this blue star.

More information can be viewed here and detailed charts can be found here.

Game for the challenge??? Have fun guys!!!
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Tachyon
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Post by Tachyon »

Wow! That's really challenging!
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jiahao1986
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Post by jiahao1986 »

Now Sag is setting already, even more challenging. There's a similar one to try, which is Pease 1 in M15.

Another interesting project would be spotting the globular clusters in M31. I personally have spotted 3 with a 5 incher. Big scope owners are sure to see many more! There're lots to see in the seemingly sparse autumn sky!
Clear skies please...

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rlow
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Post by rlow »

This is seriously tough...and I don't think I am up to that challenge...LOL

Pease 1 is also no easy-peasy...

Do understand that G1 and other extra-galactic globular clusters are not easy targets. G1 can be resolved but the other globular clusters in Andromeda Galaxy remained as star-like objects. G1 only begun showing hints of mottled "blob" globular structure at about 400x in my 15" dob, so seeing it and two others in a 5" scope was only possible because it was done by an experienced observer with good optics under extremely dark sky.
Richard Low

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jiahao1986
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Post by jiahao1986 »

rlow wrote:This is seriously tough...and I don't think I am up to that challenge...LOL

Pease 1 is also no easy-peasy...

Do understand that G1 and other extra-galactic globular clusters are not easy targets. G1 can be resolved but the other globular clusters in Andromeda Galaxy remained as star-like objects. G1 only begun showing hints of mottled "blob" globular structure at about 400x in my 15" dob, so seeing it and two others in a 5" scope was only possible because it was done by an experienced observer with good optics under extremely dark sky.
Dark skies always do magic man. We will one day bring your 15 inch to at least Australia to exploit its full potential!
Clear skies please...

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rlow
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Post by rlow »

Yes, really dark skies makes a huge difference!

For example, one can usually see only seven or eight stars in Pleiades (The Seven Sisters) with your naked eyes. Some only see six stars. Under very dark skies, I was able to observe 13 stars in Pleiades. My wife was able to see 15 stars under that same condition. So observing under dark skies will definitely make it easier to see elusive faint objects.
Richard Low

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