Ob with Monoculars

For people new to astronomy who want to ask those questions that they were afraid to ask. Receive helpful answers here.
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reis
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Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2007 10:03 pm

Ob with Monoculars

Post by reis »

Hello!

i'm new to obbing and not yet familar with the various constellations. I tried it out yesterday on the Scorpius Constellation using the mono with my right eye and my left eye on the star map (against the sky) all at the same time. I realised that I was able to figure out the 'shape' faster... know the name of the stars that made up the constellation. So is it advisable to ob with monoculars? Anyone done this before? any side effects on the eyes?

I do understand that Bino gives a wider FOV i.e i could see the entire constellation thru a bino but have not yet tried obbing with a bino... Question: wouldn't it be a hassle to bring the bino to ur eyes and away when switching between the sky and ur map?

Thanks! :wink:
...when fact is stranger than fiction...
AzuRe_is lost in Awe-ro-ra

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weixing
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Post by weixing »

Hi,
So is it advisable to ob with monoculars? Anyone done this before? any side effects on the eyes?
I think we all use a "monocular" before to find object... that call a finder scope... ha ha ha :P :P Anyway, the type of monocular you mention are not so popular because it not as comfortable and also smaller aperture than most binocular.
I do understand that Bino gives a wider FOV i.e i could see the entire constellation thru a bino but have not yet tried obbing with a bino...
Binocular give large FoV, but not so large that you can see the whole constellation with it... constellation bigger than most of us thought... We usually use binocular to look for "missing" stars in the constellation which "hidden" by the light pollution or use it to scan the sky and find objects.

Anyway, I have a binocular that I seldom used... the last time I used it was... err... can't remember :P :P You can loan it if you like to try out a binoculars.

Have a nice day.
Yang Weixing
:mrgreen: "The universe is composed mainly of hydrogen and ignorance." :mrgreen:

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chrisyeo
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Re: Ob with Monoculars

Post by chrisyeo »

reis wrote:Hello!

i'm new to obbing and not yet familar with the various constellations. I tried it out yesterday on the Scorpius Constellation using the mono with my right eye and my left eye on the star map (against the sky) all at the same time. I realised that I was able to figure out the 'shape' faster... know the name of the stars that made up the constellation. So is it advisable to ob with monoculars? Anyone done this before? any side effects on the eyes?

I do understand that Bino gives a wider FOV i.e i could see the entire constellation thru a bino but have not yet tried obbing with a bino... Question: wouldn't it be a hassle to bring the bino to ur eyes and away when switching between the sky and ur map?

Thanks! :wink:
You don't need a mono or binocular to see and identify constellations. Just hold up the map to one of the 'landmarks' in the sky and you're on your way to identifying constellations. You naked eye is best to view constellations. Should be no problem comparing map and sky once you have your bearings.

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reis
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Post by reis »

Hello Weixing and Chris!

After obbing for 3 sessions now (with weixing@tampines), my adaption to the night sky is still very poor as compared to the Master WX :(
Cant make out the whole constellation with naked eye although both of us have perfect eyesight..

Am sure I'm not the only one here with this prob and fully aware that practice is the way to go but I was thinking of ways to shorten this process... :oops:

Thanks for the advices... Seems like i gota be a bit more patient :roll: (with the local light polluted skies as well)
...when fact is stranger than fiction...
AzuRe_is lost in Awe-ro-ra

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Canopus Lim
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Post by Canopus Lim »

Yup astronomy needs patience. With WX's help, I think it will be much easier for you to learn. I learned astronomy without help so I guess people who have help will be able to learn much faster.

I find the beginning step to learning the constellations is to know where you are facing. If you know where is N,S,E,W, and you can pick out the bright stars and correlate them with the star charts. Then by first identifying the bright stars, you identify the less bright stars near it. With an experienced person with you, you will have no problems identifying the correct stars because he/she can tell you if you identified correctly. After identifying the stars near the brighter stars, you can try and trace the stars and follow the lines of the constellations to identify more of those stars that belong to the constellations. That way, soon you will be able to identify the brighter constellations with the naked eye. Those dim constellations will be tricky as you need a binoculars to identify the stars.
AstroDuck

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kayheem
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Post by kayheem »

Sometimes, not being able to see something is not poor dark adaptation, but due to inexperience or not using averted vision.

It may help if WX uses a green laser to point out the constellations.

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reis
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Post by reis »

Yeah.. WX had been sooo helpful and of cos... very patient * something i lack in * :oops:

Thanks Canopus and Kayheem for the practical tips! WX did exactly what both of u described here! Except that his laser pointer was running low on batt during last ob... haha.. :wink:

Finally got my hands on a pair of bino! Thanks to WX! Recognising the constellation was such a breeze ! :D WX also explained that its almost impossible to view stars (thru mono) and see the star chart at the same when the area is pitch dark!

So i'm convinced bino is the way to go for me... :idea:

Next to do: "red-en" my maglight!!
...when fact is stranger than fiction...
AzuRe_is lost in Awe-ro-ra

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