Iowa Meteor

Alright, this is for sharing of your observation experience. Or, if you are arranging gatherings, star-gazing expeditions or just want some company to go observing together, you can shout it out here.
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jennifer1611991
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Joined: Sun Jul 30, 2006 9:45 pm

Iowa Meteor

Post by jennifer1611991 »

I don't know if there is a post on this topic (I didn't see one:o), BUT WOW!('[smilie=admire.gif]')!
I was totally awestruck by how bright it was!! WHY DO THINGS LIKE THIS NEVER HAPPEN WHEN I STARGAZE??('[smilie=crying.gif]') I've included 2 videos from different sources, the 2nd one is epicly mindblowing!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCP5hwOX ... popt00us05

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bb8ELVB ... popt00us13

I know logically it should be (IS) a meteor, but the fact that it occurred in an area where Iowa,ehhem Capt. Kirk's birthplace('[smilie=bye2.gif]')!, had the best view, I am hoping/wishing/praying that it is.. Something else:D Any ideas/thoughts abt its origin and its size? Srsly, how big was it I wonder('[smilie=confused.gif]')

PS: I realise there are alot of emoticons. Forgive me, I just sorta figured out how to use them and they are a more accurate representation of my feelings. Also, they are just plain cute:D ('[smilie=cute.gif]')

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Tachyon
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Post by Tachyon »

It does look very impressive! Wonder why these events are mostly captured by Security cameras?
[80% Steve, 20% Alfred] ------- Probability of Clear Skies = (Age of newest equipment in days) / [(Number of observers) * (Total Aperture of all telescopes present in mm)]

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jennifer1611991
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Post by jennifer1611991 »

Yeah! It's as if no one was using their phones/cameras at that time:o Oh here's another one with the view from 2 more different vantage points:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKVgMfg4 ... popt00us13

Good gracious its bright!!'[smilie=admire.gif]'

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Airconvent
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Post by Airconvent »

Well, tiny objects hit the Earth continuously round the clock. And it gets more intense when we cross into an old comet debris path. The trick is to be there when a larger one with the right composition strikes. How intense and what colour depends on the composition of the meteor.
I presume that many such fireballs goes unoticed because either its over the ocean or at areas where no one is looking.
But congrats...you have come across one bright one.
I saw one greenish and bright fireball in Eunos during remus' obs many years back. That one lasted 2-3 seconds!

Dak' Mak Chak!*


* Klingon "Energise!"
The Boldly Go Where No Meade Has Gone Before
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United Federation of the Planets

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Airconvent
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Post by Airconvent »

The Boldly Go Where No Meade Has Gone Before
Captain, RSS Enterprise NCC1701R
United Federation of the Planets

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jennifer1611991
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Post by jennifer1611991 »

That is amazingly cool:D How I wish we could have something that detects these meteoroids within lighting speed... And woah 20 TONS of TNT??! I really wonder how big the actual rock was?

PS: ACK, KLINGON!!:D You are now the coolest person [smilie=wow.gif] I would say something but I [smilie=dying.gif].. just FAIL, at it. Emmm, majQa' ? :O

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